COMMISSION

LEADERS SANS FRONTIERE

 

SELECTION COMMITTEE FOR "LEADERS WITHOUT BORDERS" HELD AT UNITED NATIONS HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK
on 23 April 2002
(conference room C)

 

Were present:

  Ms. Nicole Elisha, Counsellor, representing H.E. Mr. Joël Wassi Adechi, Permanent Representative of Benin to the United Nations

  Mr. Santiago Irazabal Mourao, Counsellor, representing H.E. Mr. Gelson Fonseca, Jr. Permanent Representative of Brazil to the United Nations

  Ms. Séraphine Toe, Counsellor, representing the Government of Burkina Faso to the Selection Committee for "Leaders without Borders" and H.E. Mr. Michel Kafando, Permanent Representative of Burkina Faso to the United Nations

  Mr. Luc Joseph Okio, Minister Counsellor, representing H.E. Mr. Basile Ikouebe, Permanent Representative of the Congo to the United Nations

  Mr. Birhanemeskel Abebe, Second Secretary, representing H.E Mr. Abdul Mejid Hussein, Permanent Representative of Ethiopia to the United Nations

  Mr. Gocha Lordkipanidze, Minister Counsellor, representing H.E. Mr. Peter P. Chkheidze, Permanent Representative of Georgia to the United Nations

  Mrs. Olga Anagnostopoulou, Second Secretary, representing H.E. Mr. Elias Gounaris, Permanent Representative of Greece to the United Nations

  M. Abdou Adamou, Counsellor, representing H.E. M. Ousmane Moutari, Permanent Representative of Niger to the United Nations

  Mr. Michel Thao Chan, President of the Organizational Board of the Cercle de Réflexion

  Mr. Bruce Boeglin, Counsellor of the Cercle de Réflexion

  Mr. Patrick Brémaud, Vice President of the Organizational Board of the Cercle de Réflexion

  Mr. François Gaucher, Vice President of the Organizational Board of the Cercle de Réflexion

  Mr. Jean- Luc Pérez, Co-President of the Selection Committee for "Leaders without Borders"

  The Ambassadors of Canada, Cyprus, the Republic of Korea and Uganda sent apologies for being unable to attend this meeting owing to previous commitments.

 

·    1. Words of welcome, election of the Chairman and adoption of the agenda (agenda item 1 and 2)

 

·    1.1. Mr. Pérez opened the meeting at 10:00 am. Welcoming the participants, he indicated that the meeting had been called in compliance with the wish expressed by the Working Group of the Selection Committee for "Leaders without Borders" at its meeting, held on 20 March 2002 at United Nations Headquarters, with the representatives of Burkina Faso, Burundi, Niger, Rwanda and UNDP participating. At the end of this meeting, the Cercle de Réflexion was in charged of introducing a feasibility study for the Doctorate in Peace Administration in which the Committee would examine the strategies and actions in the working session of 23 April.

 

·    1.2. By acclamation, Mr. Pérez was confirmed as Chairman of the Committee. Upon his motion, the provisional agenda was adopted, with the exception of items 4, 5 and 6, which were deferred to a later meeting of the Committee.

 

·    2. Discussion of the main trends of the global feasibility project for the Doctorate in Peace Administration (agenda item 3)

  The Chairman suggested that the Committee consider in turn the two main trends of the

  programme for the doctorate, namely, making the United Nations peace philosophy widely known and the practical implementation of this philosophy in the field by "Leaders without Borders".

 

·    A. Making the United Nations peace philosophy widely known.

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·    A.1. Mr. Brémaud indicated that overall, the group of subject included in the training programme of the Doctorate in Peace Administration represented the multiple aspects of the United Nations peace philosophy, based on non-violence, tolerance and mutual respect for peoples and cultures, a philosophy of compassion and love for suffering mankind.

 

·    A.2. The representative of Congo felt that the thesis subjects of the Doctorate in Peace Administration would serve to enrich the United Nations peace philosophy and the representative of Niger added that it was "ignorance that generated strife among peoples" and that "education was essential".

 

·    A.3. The complexity of the origin of conflicts was mentioned by the representative of Brazil, who felt that the doctorate courses would be " concrete instruments to understand and act" for peace; such training was qualified as a "noble objective" by the

  representative of Greece, who expressed the wish that the training programme include comparative studies that highlighted common points and the main directions of " world culture," which was the key to the United Nations peace philosophy.

 

·    A.4. The representative of Brazil added that the "notion of peace did not simply mean absence of conflict ". He felt that the training programme was sufficient to " identify and understand each situation." He insisted on the fact that peace must be built. That opinion was shared by the representative of Niger, who added that such peace-building efforts required a "knowledge of the true cause of conflicts".

 

·    A.5. While appreciating the appropriate balance of the programme, the representative of Georgia note that the programme also covered the "psychology of peace" as well as the fundamental values which it stressed. He suggested that the "diversity and the daily management of such diversity" should be included in the programme. The same idea was echoed by the representative of Brazil, who felt that the management of interdependence and diversity was "crucial". He added that the core notion of the training was the "exercise of tolerance" and that "the different readings of the world around us required a common language".

 

·    A.6. Recalling that his country comprised 80 ethnic groups, with different languages and beliefs, the representative of Ethiopia stressed the importance of tolerance, which was at the core of the United Nations peace philosophy.

 

·    B. Practical fields implementation of the United Nations peace philosophy by the "Leaders without Borders".

 

·    B.1. The Chairman pointed out that the future Doctorate in Peace Administration would be "Leaders without Borders" that is to say " messengers and builders of peace" and that, consequently, training would be entirely focused on the practical implementation in the field of the United Nations peace philosophy. Mr. Chan added that students would be assessed on research and concrete implementation in the field, in their own countries, of such solutions for peace as educating the young generations in matters of peace.

 

·    B.2. The representative of Greece wondered to what extent peace would be taught and whether the resulting diplomas would be recognized. She nevertheless fully supported the idea, as she felt that "the new generations will make tomorrow's world. The representative of Brazil confirmed that " if indeed peace was more that the absence of conflict, an early start must be made in the field of education".

 

·    B.3. The representative of the Congo felt that "the training will have reached its aim if the United Nations fundamental ideas are spread". Mr. Chan responded that the candidate's mission was precisely to spread that philosophy of peace, while adapting it to their countries specific characteristics and that they would have at their disposal teaching materials, such as folders or computer diskettes.

 

·    B.4. The representative of Niger insisted on the earnestness and motivation of the candidates, who had to be "available, hard-working and ambitious". He felt that they should "seek locally, at the national level, the support of their governments, ministers and universities and get political backing." The representative of Ethiopia feared that "the absence of immediate, visible results" might slow down the involvement of the political class in the teaching peace to the new generations. He nevertheless concluded that there was a need to persevere for "it was the future that mattered most", an opinion shared by the representative of Georgia who agreed that "what was learned at a young age becomes a value".

 

·    B.5. The representative of Brazil then suggested four basic ideas to sum up the Committee's work:

  (a) He suggested gaining a deeper understanding of the United Nations peace philosophy by resorting to " the institutional memory of the United Nations and its practical experience in the field".

  (b) With regard to the teaching of peace to the young generations, he moved that a project be initiated for the development of a general concept, to be adopted be the educational institutions in every country and which would be " notional enough and sufficiently universal to be adaptable to actual field conditions."

  (c) He advocated lobbying the political class in every country, as well as all organizations and institutions working for peace.

  (d) He felt that the Doctorate in Peace Administration should be broadly recognized at the international level and should be the subject of officially accredited action.

 

·    3. Summary of the work and closing of the debate (agenda item 4)

 

·    3. 1. The Chairman recalling the summing up in paragraph B.5, made the following proposals:

  (a) Establish, within the Cercle de Réflexion, a "Commission for the Children of Peace", bringing together the permanent missions to the United Nations and the United Nations agencies and other institutions involved in working for children and for peace. This Commission would draft the outline of a syllabus for teaching of peace to young generations, with the involvement of the institutions of each country and in collaboration with the field actions of "Leaders without Borders" and the UNCR Corps of Volunteers for Peace.

  (b) Accelerate the application for international recognition of the Doctorate in Peace

  Administration by the governments of the United Nations Member and Observer States.

  The proposals were adopted.

 

·    3.2. The Chairman closed the debate and adjourned the meeting at 1:00 p.m.

 

Jean-Luc Pérez

  President of the Selection Committee for "Leaders without Borders"